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  • IT’S ALL BS! We’re All Wrong And You’re All Right!

IT’S ALL BS! We’re All Wrong And You’re All Right!

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  • By Dr. Jason Richardson PsyD. MBA
  • Speaker, Author, Psychologist
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Overview

Challenge your perception, change your results.
Moments are what we aim for—being crowned champion, accepting the diploma, watching your child take his or her first steps. Indelible time stamps in our minds, and fleeting just the same. The moment there’s a slight shift in perspective or a nudge in a particular direction is all it takes to experience exponential gains down the road.

Being a winner in life extends beyond the scoreboard, the track, and the field. Gem-encrusted championship rings are sold on eBay by ring holders who found themselves either broke, in legal trouble, or just plain desperate. If only they applied the same mindset to their off-the-field life as they did to their game. If only they embraced the same belief system (hereafter referred to as “B.S.”) they held when they were on the field of play. If only they recognized the game was not confined to the minutes on the shot clock or the seconds between the start and finish line. It’s time we expand our understanding of winning the game from four quarters or two halves to a period that spans a lifetime. Make no mistake, we’re all playing the long game whether we like it or not, whether we know it or not, whether we want to or not. In the game of life, anybody can win, but not everyone is a winner or believes they are!

IT'S ALL BS! We're All Wrong And You're ALL Right!

“Acknowledgements
Foreword
Introduction: Winning the Human Race
Chapter 1: You’ve Been Told NO More Than You Know.
Chapter 2: The Honest Lie
Chapter 3: Raw Data vs. Interpreted Data
Chapter 4: We’re All Black Sheep?
Chapter 5: The CEO
Chapter 6: Self-Esteem Is Not Enough—But You Are!
Chapter 7: This is some B.S.! Belief Systems
Chapter 8: Will That Be Paper Or Plasticity?
Chapter 9: The Infinite Continuum: Been There, Done That!
Chapter 10: Fighting over the Emote Control: Feelings Are Not Facts
Chapter 11: You Better Reconcile! Start Counting . . .
Chapter 12: The Market: It’s Bigger Than You
Discretionary Bonus(es) Chapter: Work, Play, Life: Profit and Loss Statement

You’ve Been Told NO More Than You Know.

One of the perks of being a psychologist is that everyone tells you everything, eventually! Hearing that Mr. X is cheating on Mrs. X is unfortunate. It’s also more than a bit clichéd when you find out Mr. X cheated with the nanny or Mrs. X’s best friend. Those are the big issues: cheating spouses, depression, anxiety, eating disorders, ADHD, etc. Everyone more or less knows the reasons why they’re on the couch if they are dealing with one of these issues in their lives. What is peculiar and what often raises red flags are the things people tend to casually breeze over during their session:

Client: “Yeah, back when I was a drug dealer …” or, “She called the cops on me but …”

Me: “Pardon me. What did you just say? Can we press rewind?”

What is of particular interest is the more nuanced dialogue disguised as common sense. These clichés are often more dubious than we think, warranting, at the very least, a cautionary yellow flag:

“You need a fallback plan.” Plan B sucks!”
“Don’t put all your eggs in one basket.” Easter egg hunting will never be the same.
“You can’t have your cake and eat it, too!” Stale cake doesn’t do anyone good.
“Not everybody will (or can) become a ________.” If not you, then who?

Part of the reason for waving the yellow caution flag on these clichés lays in their ubiquity and that the ubiquitous is generally taken for granted or accepted as fact. Like a Starbucks in every strip mall or the fact that the Lululemon store is almost always placed within eyeshot of the Apple Store. What we assume we are taking at face value still communicates a deeper message.

The four sayings above are spoken as if “that’s just the way it is” and they’re understood as if they are not to be questioned. Many of us subconsciously sabotage our inclination toward the initial thing we want to do because these clichés have hidden back doors built into them—a way out when the going gets tough.

The good news is this: you are primed for an amazing amount of optimism. How else would you come up with such grand ideas in the first place? The irony? Our friends, parents, and school counselors say such things out of good intention, so we don’t get our hopes up too much. The problem is1 that, on your way to doing or becoming what you want in life, you have been told N-O more times than you can k-n-o-w2 and, unfortunately, in more ways than you would expect.

The other day I heard a kid tell his dad that he wanted to be a pro athlete, and the first thing that came out of the parent’s mouth was, “Well son, that means you’ve got to practice a lot and study real hard—not everyone makes it to the pros.” At that point I thought to myself, “Why on earth would this kid want to continue down that path? How is this motivating? Especially to a kid.” Somewhere between Daniel Coyle’s book, The Talent Code, and anything Malcolm Gladwell has written, we feel it’s necessary to impress upon our younger protégés, children, or mentees, just how much work it takes to achieve. But does a ten-year-old need to know it takes 10,000 hours to gain mastery in a subject?3 Shouldn’t we just say to such a bright-eyed boy, “Cool, let’s make it happen!”

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Dr. Jason Richardson PsyD. MBA

Before he was "Dr." Jason Richardson, Jason travelled the world as a Professional BMX Racer while maintaining a Top-Ten World or National Ranking for the better part of his 15-year career. In 1994 Jason Richardson earned the distinction of UCI World Champion at the age of 19. Thirteen years later, he earned the Gold Medal at the 2007 PanAM Games in Rio De Janeiro, Brazil. He successfully transiti...

Before he was "Dr." Jason Richardson, Jason travelled the world as a Professional BMX Racer while maintaining a Top-Ten World or National Ranking for the better part of his 15-year career. In 1994 Jason Richardson earned the distinction of UCI World Champion at the age of 19. Thirteen years later, he earned the Gold Medal at the 2007 PanAM Games in Rio De Janeiro, Brazil. He successfully transitioned out of racing in 2008 with a Top 3 National ranking. (He was also the oldest competitor at the Games and at that time he retired). Throughout his entire athletic tenure, Jason pushed to achieve academic and career goals that extended beyond the field of competition. Building on his Bachelors Degree in Philosophy, Jason went on to get an MBA and then his Doctorate in Psychology. Back in his racing days, his nickname was “JRich”. Today, friends and clients call him DrJRich! Jason has worked with top brands in the bicycle industry like GT, Shimano, Haro, and Giant, as well as other major brands like Adidas, Spy, Vans, Airwalk, and No Fear. He has mentored youth, served on the Board of Directors of two National non-profit organizations, and developed/marketed after-school programs for at-risk youth. His unique experiences and broad perspective allow him to connect and communicate to most anyone looking to gain the advantage in their work, play, and life.

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